Specialties

What We Do

NYS offer quality services to many client types, with different needs and requirements. We are committed to tailoring our services to suit our clients needs.

Quality and Selection

We are committed and have heavily invested in screening all applicants’ to ensure that our specialist staff meet our own standards of excellence, efficiency, patient safety, trustworthiness and consistency in delivery. It allows us to meet our high client expectations without having to compromise on quality.

Internal Systems

Our high technology processes, effective organisation, resources and attention to detail enable us to operate quickly and efficiently to deliver high standards

Flexibility

We recognize that depending on the situation and circumstance, the status of your needs can change. For this reason NYS’s services are geared up to allow for maximum flexibility at short notices. We actively advertise and welcome applications from experienced and well qualified healthcare professionals in order to speed up your requests and offer flexibility.

Compliance

NYS engage in a firm selective process to ensure nurses and healthcare assistants are only selected after 100% of the recruitment process is completed.

  • We personally interview all candidates on a face to face setting.
  • All security checks are carried out with the DBS Disclosure Barring Services.
  • All employment history, training, qualifications and references are thoroughly checked out and confirmed.
  • A training needs analysis is undertaken to identify individual training requirements to maintain compliance and for the professional development of our staff.
  • An ‘expiry report’ is generated to ensure certification of our professionals is kept up to date and where necessary a new/refreshed training plan is implemented.

Our Blog

6 Ways for Seniors to Stay Active

Staying healthy and getting moving is important at every stage of life, and especially for seniors. While it may seem difficult, it’s something that can be accomplished. After all, age is just a number, and a healthy and active lifestyle can be achieved despite the presence of disability, past injury or low fitness levels. No matter what age, exercise will…

Tips to Provide Better In-Home Care

Even when their need for specialized care is great, older people prefer to stay at home. Often adult children and other family members take on the care giving responsibilities — providing rides, picking up prescriptions and helping out around the house. Eventually, they may even be managing high-tech medical treatments, assisting with daily activities and dealing with end-of-life issues. Registered…

Tips for Keeping the Senior in Your Life Active

Regular exercise can keep you fit and help you stay independent as you age. Other benefits may include faster recovery from illness, reduced risk of chronic disease and better management of existing medical problems such as osteoarthritis. Here are some tips for staying active in your senior years. Choose activities you find interesting and manageable. You are more likely to…

Alzheimer’s/Dementia

Alzheimer’s/Dementia refers to a serious loss of mental abilities such as thinking, remembering, reasoning and communicating. Dementia is not a normal part of aging. It can be difficult to know whether you or your loved one is suffering from Alzheimer’s/Dementia as the symptoms typically appear gradually (beginning with memory loss).

Saveo knows from personal and professional experience that caring for a loved one suffering from Alzheimer’s/Dementia can be physically, emotionally and mentally exhausting.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Not all tumors are cancerous; benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss.

While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes. Over 100 types of cancers affect humans. Tobacco use is the cause of about 22% of cancer deaths.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. This damage disrupts the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate, resulting in a range of signs and symptoms, including physical, mental, and sometimes psychiatric problems.

Specific symptoms can include double vision, blindness in one eye, muscle weakness, trouble with sensation, or trouble with coordination. MS takes several forms, with new symptoms either occurring in isolated attacks.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Parkinson’s

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. The symptoms generally come on slowly over time. Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking. Thinking and behavioral problems may also occur.

Dementia becomes common in the advanced stages of the disease. Depression and anxiety are also common occurring in more than a third of people with PD. Other symptoms include sensory, sleep, and emotional problems.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Stroke

A stroke is when poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. They result in part of the brain not functioning properly. Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body.

Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. A stroke may also be associated with a headache.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal